Why PRP for Hair Loss is Safe and Will Not Cause Cancer, but a PRP Combination is a Better Treatment

Why PRP for Hair Loss is Safe and Will Not Cause Cancer, but a PRP Combination is a Better Treatment


Thank you for your question. You submitted your question without a photo.
And you stated in your question that you’re interested in thickening your hair with PRP
and that you’re 35-years-old but then you read in a forum that there’s a link between
PRP and cancer and so you’re asking about that particular concern and naturally, you
want to make sure that there’s no significant risk like cancer associated with PRP. Well, I can certainly share with you how I
discuss PRP with my patients in my practice. A little bit of background, I’m a Board-certified
cosmetic surgeon and Fellowship-trained oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgeon. I have
been in practice in Manhattan and Long Island for over 20 years. I am also the founder of
TrichoStem™ Hair Regeneration Centers. This is a system we developed which began with
the use of PRP and a material called extracellular matrix which has become a very significant
path to helping people with hair loss non-surgically for both male and female pattern hair loss
and I’ll discuss this a little bit further as I discuss the concerns you have with your
question. So to understand the time wherein, in terms
of the role of PRP with hair loss, I have to say that I’m reflecting on a lot of years
of experience with PRP. In fact in our practice, as a cosmetic surgeon, we use PRP very routinely.
We use it for wrinkles, we use it for acne scars, we use it for under eye dark circles.
And as I said earlier, we combine PRP with a material called extracellular matrix for
the treatment of male and female pattern hair loss. Now, to go into further to how people are
doing research in the modern world, we often use in the medical field the term “Dr. Google”
and essentially, everyone does research by going into the web. That’s a fact of reality
especially in the practice of medicine. The challenge is being able to distinguish good
useful information from what is being bounced around without having any clear understanding
of the source and the authority of that information. In the modern world, information is often
repeated and is given a certain value, because of that even though it may or may not be necessarily
factually based. And the concern also about forums, you know, I think one of the challenges
again is that there are good things that come with people having an open dialogue discussion
and then there is of course understanding who is actually participating in these dialogues
and discussions and further, what is the agenda of people who run the forums. So without getting into specifics, I can tell
you that like yourself, a lot of people who come to us have this type of concern and I
can tell you that if you’re specifically talking about let’s say just about the scalp,
let’s just limit it there. We have already enough experience of PRP in multiple areas
throughout the body. And the history of PRP in medicine began with oral surgery back in
the late 90s then went on with orthopedic surgery and then went on further to aesthetics.
Now interestingly, there was a tremendous amount of skepticism and resistance by plastic
surgeons and dermatologists about the benefits of PRP and in particular, the benefits of
it in hair loss. Recently, publications are coming out about the benefits of PRP with
hair loss and remarkably, like the behavior of an entire herd, almost every patient who
has previously had PRP injection will mention that they had a dermatologist do the PRP injection
which is kind of interesting because there were a lot of dermatologists dismissing PRP
and its value. Nevertheless, as far as when you think of
cancers in the scalp, you have to think about basically hair is a skin appendage which means
you have to think of various types of skin cancers and their relative risks. Relatively
risk for skin cancers are essentially are more related to ultraviolet light such as
sunlight or sun damage as a source for conversion of particular cell lines into cancer. So the
cancers that you have to be concerned about if you want to be checked include basal cell
carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Now even though there may be some theoretical
ideas around PRP and its role in causing cancer or accelerating cancer, I have not any concern
about that. I think that the mechanism of cancer has to do more with repeated exposure
to something that converts cells through DNA damage into tumor cells. Now PRP is derived from your own blood and
to go further now into the details of how we manage hair loss and now I could say that
I have no reservations with using PRP anywhere else in the body including the scalp. I also
want to give you some guidance as to what is the role of PRP in hair loss. To begin
with, we have to understand that hair loss has to be managed individually. Everybody
comes into the world, as I have observed and we have been doing this particular treatment
Hair Regeneration for the past 7 years and we have been treating patients from all over
the world. Hair loss is expressed in different ways for different people and there is one
common reality. Hair loss is progressive and when I look at people, I think of where do
they fall in that relative amount of progression. So I look at patients in terms of age of onset,
the age they are currently are at when they come for consultation, the degree of hair
loss and then make a determination as to the relative aggressiveness of that hair loss. Now, the physiologic effects of PRP alone
in my experience has been a short-term stimulation of hair growth. It doesn’t necessarily stop
the progression but in a way, indirectly appears to because you start to get regrowth. The
sustainability of that regrowth is going to be variable. And what I have observed now
that more people are offering PRP is that patients are coming to me and basically expressing
and relaying to me the general lack of experience of the doctor performing it and I can understand
that. When you are doing something like this relatively new, you still don’t understand
exactly how it’s going to behave until you have enough clinical experience. And I can tell you that what we have done
in our practice is we’ve done something called Hair Regeneration. Hair Regeneration
was developed from the observation that thinning hair became thicker when we use this material,
extracellular matrix with PRP at the time of hair transplant. Over the course or several
years, I developed a system and protocol and ultimately, we’ve been able to manage and
help people with hair loss both male and female pattern hair loss. When we do this treatment,
we’re able to establish much longer term management of hair loss and that is where
there’s a big distinction. A lot of people who go for PRP have to go with some frequency
either every month, every 3 months and with no clear understanding as to what is the horizon
of that continual treatment. And what happens if you stop? With our system
and what we’re doing, like I said, we’ve been treating patients from all over the world,
we have a lot of experience that we are able to provide our patients with more accurate
prognosis and a proper approach that essentially is typically one injection and then we follow
our patients for 5 years and see them every 3-6 months. And then in certain patients,
we do something like a booster treatment somewhere in 15-18 months again depending on their particular
category of hair loss. In terms of safety, I think that you can put
your mind at ease that it is a safe modality and it should not cause you to develop a malignancy.
But I would recommend that you learn more about PRP. Learn about your doctor’s experience
with this and also learn about Hair Regeneration and the concept of using PRP with extracellular
matrix in terms of the management of hair loss in your specific type. So I hope that was helpful, I wish you the
best of luck and thank you for your question.

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