What Your Hair Reveals About Your Health

What Your Hair Reveals About Your Health


Your hair can provide great insight into your
overall health and well-being. It’s important to recognize the many different
ways in which the hair on your head can reflect what’s happening inside your body. Let’s take a closer look at what your hair
might actually be telling you. Thyroid trouble The butterfly-shaped endocrine gland that’s
found in the front of your neck is your thyroid, and its role is to release hormones that regulate
your metabolism, not to mention several other bodily functions. When your thyroid isn’t working properly,
this hormone imbalance can lead to numerous health issues, including hair loss. In fact, hair loss can result from both hyperthyroidism,
which is caused by an overactive thyroid producing too many hormones, or hypothyroidism, which
is caused by an underactive thyroid not producing enough hormones. So if you’re experiencing significant hair
loss, especially in addition to other symptoms, your thyroid might be the culprit. Other causes of hair loss A misbehaving thyroid isn’t the only reason
you might be seeing an unusually large amount of hair in your drain after your shower. Other causes include fungal infections, like
ringworm, or bacterial infections that can cause folliculitis, which is the inflammation
of your hair follicles. That’s not all. If you recently had a baby, you may experience
a condition known as telogen effluvium, which is a sizeable loss of hair. In fact, this typically happens during the
first five months after pregnancy, and affects nearly fifty percent of women. And even things as simple as iron deficiencies,
too much vitamin A, skin conditions like psoriasis, or simply being under a great deal of stress
can lead to greater-than-usual hair loss. Meanwhile, older women may experience hair
loss because of menopause and the lower amounts of estrogen and progesterone in your body. In short, there are reasons large and small
if you start noticing a lot of hair loss, so be sure to chat with a doctor to find out
why. What if you have lackluster hair? Having brittle and dull hair are common complaints
for many women, no matter their hair types. And while you may do everything in your power
to fix your follicles, perhaps you’ve noticed that your attempts have literally fallen flat. But while overworking, over-processing, and
over-styling your hair end up hurting it overall, there are other health-related factors that
you may be overlooking when it comes to your seemingly misbehaving mane. What medical reasons may be to blame when
your brittle, boring hair is causing you heartbreak? Pack some protein While you may not realize it, there’s a powerful
connection between your daily diet and your lovely locks. And when your daily regimen is lacking protein,
not only will your muscles, immune system, and overall health suffer, but one of the
many side effects is weak, brittle, and breakable hair. Each strand of hair consists of mostly protein,
which is why your intake of the nutrient is so vital for hair growth. If you’re not ingesting enough protein, your
body will do its best to conserve the little amount of protein you have for usage elsewhere,
so your hair won’t grow properly. Other diet don’ts While we’re looking more closely at your diet,
it’s worth noting that what you put into your system affects your whole body. Fast food, unsurprisingly, can negatively
impact your health. Research has shown that those who eat fast
food have a lower intake of healthier items, such as vegetables, fruits, as well as essential
vitamins and minerals. And that means you’re missing out on key nutrients
that are crucial for hair growth. So if you’re really looking to see a positive
change in the quality and quantity of your hair, it’s important to value healthy produce
over expensive hair products. What’s more, if you start a crash diet and
deprive yourself of proper nutrition, your weight loss may be soon followed by hair loss. The American Academy of Dermatology says that
hair loss can occur approximately three to six months after losing more than 15 pounds. They also say that sufferers of certain eating
disorders, like anorexia and bulimia, can experience hair loss as well. In a word, a healthy diet is an essential
part of having the vibrant hair you so desire. Going gray? It’s genetic Researchers have managed to pinpoint the exact
gene that’s responsible for your graying hair color. In fact, the gene that controls and produces
melanin — the pigment that determines your eye, skin, and hair color — starts producing
less and less of it as you age. But just when this decrease in melanin happens
is predetermined by your specific genes. That’s why some women go gray in their twenties
and others into their late forties or even fifties. Too much worrying The negative effects of excessive worrying
are pretty well documented — but if stomach aches, panic attacks, and depression aren’t
enough to worry about, stress can also turn your hair prematurely gray. (screams!) In fact, it’s been shown that continually
feeling stressed and anxious can accelerate the graying process due to the inflammation
that this stress causes throughout your body. However, there are steps you can take to manage
your anxiety in ways that help your hair and your health: there’s deep breathing, exercise,
practicing mindfulness, and mediation. In fact, your mantra can be “no gray today.” Thanks for watching! Click the List icon to subscribe to our YouTube
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