What is Eczema – DERMCLASS

What is Eczema – DERMCLASS


Mikey, my 3-year-old, was born with little red blotchy patches throughout
his body, from head to toe. And Levi, who’s 1, was born with
bigger red patches, but very few of. After much research and talking to moms
through social media, I can tell you there’s quite a few myths out there
on what eczema is. Let’s listen in to a dermatologist
to see what she says. Eczema is an inflammatory condition of the skin. It has a number of different signs and symptoms. You can see redness, flakiness or scaliness. The skin can be itchy, hot and sometimes
even thick to the touch. And sometimes it’s painful, as well. Eczema is not contagious. So, if someone has eczema and
you touch them or you’re close to them,
you’re not going to catch their eczema. Eczema is a skin disease, and the eczema
can affect people of all ages. It can affect small patches on the body,
or it can affect the entire body. No, this isn’t true. There are chapters and chapters of different types of
eczema in our dermatology textbooks. Some of the more common types of eczema would be
atopic dermatitis, which is a genetic condition. Contact dermatitis, which has to do with
products or ingredients that touch the skin. And then there’s also seborrheic dermatitis, which is a type that is often seen on
the face and on the scalp. There’s often confusion between eczema and
another skin condition known as psoriasis. It’s a little bit difficult
for people to tell the difference, because the symptoms can be quite similar. They both have red skin. The both have scaly skin.
They can both be itchy. And they can affect various parts of the body. Some of the distinct differences
that we see as dermatologists is that psoriasis tends to be
more pink than it is red. In psoriasis you often see thicker areas,
we call them plaques. You can also have psoriasis
in more classic areas such as the elbows, the knees and the scalp. But sometimes it can affect
many parts of the body as well. So, if you’re struggling with whether
you have eczema or psoriasis, the best thing to do is seek the expertise of
a board-certified dermatologist who can give you the right diagnosis,
and then lead you to the appropriate treatment. In our home, we ensure that
all of our body washes are fragrance-free, soap-free, paraben-free, and contain anti-itching properties
with a good pH balance. The kids get a generous application of a lipid-replenishing moisturizer
that is also fragrance-free. Remember: the goal is to avoid anything that will irritate
or trigger any flare-ups. The more you itch, the worse it’s going to be.

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