What happens during an infusion with biologics?

What happens during an infusion with biologics?


Hello Mia, my name is Alison and this is Louise. Have you come along today, to show all the boys and girls, having a cannula in? Yeah. Well that’s very kind of you. What is a cannula? Well, a cannula is a small tube. A little plastic tube that goes into the back of your hand or in the bend of your arm, and we put some medicine in it or some fluids or a special medicine that’s called a general anaesthetic, to make you go to sleep. So do you know why you’re having the medicine today? Yeah? Cause I have Arthritis. You have Arthritis. Have you got any sore bits today? Yeah, in my shoulder. Okay. So do you think the medicine will help it get better today? Yeah. I think it will. Can you remember the name of the medicine? Tocoluzamab? How clever you, Tocilizumab and it’s a biologic medicine. That’s something that helps stop inflammation. So do you remember a time, when it wasn’t quite so easy to have a cannula in? Yeah. What happened then? I got really scared and I didn’t like it. Oh no, did you get a bit upset and cry? Yeah. So what helps make it better now? Nemo. Great, we love Nemo. And I noticed you’ve got a book down there as well. Do you like looking for Where’s Wally? Yeah. So that’s helpful as well. So the reason why we’ve got two nurses today is not because we always need two nurses, but because I’m gonna hold your arm steady. Because you don’t like the band that goes around your arm, that’s called a tourniquet. Now do you need any numbing cream or any cold spray? Not really. Want to look at your book? Yeah. Good girl. Okay, are you going to stay nice and still. You ready? Will we tape it up? Okay. We’ll take some blood sampling from you. Yeah. Alison, can you pop a wee finger on there? You’re watching. Yeah. Don’t you want to look at your book? That’s it. Okay, give it a wee drink, a wee flush. Yeah. There we go. I don’t know why, but I can feel it. [laughing] Is it cold? A bit cold. Put a plaster on top. Put a bandage on. There we go, all done. That’s a good girl. Now before we can give you your medicine, we just have to check your name and your birth date. Right, we’ll take the bandage off. Oh, gently, gently, gently, gently. That’s a good girl, well done. That’s fine. I’ll just put on my gloves Mia. We’ll get ready to clean the end of your cannula. Now, let me know how this feels. Okay. Feels okay. Yeah, that’s a flush. That feels good. Good, we’ll just let that run for a minute. This feels really weird. Does it feel funny? Yeah. Do you want the bandage back on? Yeah. Do you feel it going in? Yeah. What does it feel like? Hmm. Does it feel hot or cold? Quite cold. Okay, that’s good. That means it’s working well and the medicines are going into your arm. I’m pleased. How long do I have to wait? It will take about an hour. Hi Mia, that’s your infusion finished now. How was it today? Good. Is it alright if we take out your cannula now? Yeah. Okay. Do you find it’s sore when we take it out? No, not really. Okay, that’s fine. Are you okay with a plaster today? Yeah. Okay, that’s fine. Thank you very much for helping us today for filming your cannula. You’re a very good girl. You’re welcome.

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