Psoriasis

Psoriasis


Our immune system operates much like a modern police force: the most delicate task is forensics, where evidence is analyzed to determine if
a crime has been committed, and how to respond. Tiny forensics labs called lymph nodes are
spread throughout our bodies. Street cops called phagocytes search for microbes. When suspicious-looking microbes are found,
they are brought to the nearest lab for analysis. Street cops mostly bring back harmless microbes like unlicensed-lemonade stand operators and graffiti artists. Pathologists ignore them. Sometimes street cops bring back microbes that are not dangerous, as long as they are not too numerous. When these microbes overgrow, pathologists send more street cops to keep them in check. Infrequently, street cops bring back dangerous microbes which need to be stamped-out fast! In these cases, pathologists send-in marines called lymphocytes. When marines are called into action, they storm the area where the dangerous microbe was first seen. For a few weeks, marines are given the authority to impose martial law anywhere they want, allowing them to run ahead of spreading microbes. Scouts are sent all over the body, and if they find the same microbe, even tiny amounts, they radio-in for backup. After a few weeks, marines lose the authority to impose martial law, ending inflammation. Good pathologists are crucial for your health. If they wait too long to call-in marines when serial-killer microbes are on the loose, we die. If they call-in marines for everyday misdemeanors, chronic inflammation ensues. To reduce symptoms caused by trigger happy pathologists, doctors can use drugs that cut the chain-of-command. In psoriasis, these marines often originate where the fungus Candida is overabundant, usually in the gut. Yet there is no Candida on psoriatic skin,
only Malassezia! This makes little sense, unless pathologists are confusing fungal species! All fungi have similar fingerprints, so psoriasis seems to often be a case of mistaken identity occurring the in gut, and attacking Malassezia is like starting the Vietnam war: our immune system cannot win because they’re too good at hiding! Eliminating Candida in the gut often improves psoriasis symptoms because confused pathologists stop sending marines to fight Malassezia, and after a while those already there leave. The same mechanism also applies to many cases of psoriatic arthritis and atopic dermatitis. Share this video with the hashtag #Malassezia and click here to help keep Malassezia at bay.

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