Meet Our Team | Dr. Chris Mecoli

Meet Our Team | Dr. Chris Mecoli


(soft calming music) – Hello, my name is Dr. Chris Mecoli and I’m a Rheumatologist in
the Division of Rheumatology here in Baltimore, Maryland. My main areas of interest
are two rare conditions. One is inflammatory myositis. The other is scleroderma, otherwise known as systemic sclerosis. Within these diagnoses
there are conditions such as dermatomyositis, polymyositis, necrotizing myopathies,
as well as various forms of scleroderma, like linear and localized, that I specialize in. (upbeat cheerful music) Rheumatology was always one
of the most interesting fields as I was training in medicine. Many doctors were unfamiliar
with the diagnoses and weren’t sure how to
diagnose and treat them, and that interested me. I also liked the continuity of care that the specialty provided, building relationships with
patients over many years is something that was
very appealing to me. So being part of two different centers I have two themes of my research. In the myositis realm
one of my main interests is the relationship between
cancer and myositis itself. So there are a lot of uncertainties as to which patients are at
increased risk for cancer, how we should go about evaluating them, and for how long we should
really screen them for cancer. So some of those questions
are what we’re trying to answer in my research. We’re also looking at what are called patient
reported outcome measures. These are basically
things that are important to patients that we measure
in both our clinical studies as well as clinical trials to get a better sense of the disease. My research interest in scleroderma, similar to that of myositis, also involved cancer and
about studying the best ways of screening patients for
cancer who have scleroderma. In addition, we also
have a lot of interest in what called vascular
outcomes of scleroderma. Meaning digital ulcers,
commonly of the fingertips, as well as pulmonary hypertension, which is high blood pressures
in the lung circulation. We’re looking at better ways of predicting these complications, which will hopefully lead to
better ways of treating them. I think now more than ever, specifically at Johns Hopkins, we have a capability of
performing multi-center studies, meaning we are partnering with
a lot of other institutions to really pull our data together
to study these diseases, which is really important given the rarity of all these conditions. It helps to be one of the
largest centers in the world, but really it helps even more to partner with other institutions to
increase that number further. (enthusiastic drum music)

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