Jennifer’s Story | Finding comfort in the journey

Jennifer’s Story | Finding comfort in the journey


Otezla® (apremilast) is a prescription
medicine approved for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque
psoriasis for whom phototherapy or systemic therapy is appropriate.
“Basically I’ve worn my hair pretty much the same way for 30 years. Back when my
plaque psoriasis was at its worst, I had plaques that went all the way
around my face and my scalp, behind my ears, and a lot way back in my hairline.
So I could never wear my hair up, I always wore it kind of forward, it kind
of hides you; you know? It’s like having a mask but it’s not a mask. When I was diagnosed I felt confused and
uninformed. Well initially there was a lot of creams and SAVs. So you kind of
tried a different cream, and if that one didn’t work then you went and got a
different one, and then if that didn’t work you got something else; and it was
more of a trial and error and it was mostly error. I was very self-conscious
of myself, like I lived a lot of my life without really seeing the world, because
I was too busy being withdrawn in myself.” “She had a lot of really tough
times when her psoriasis got really bad. It was a rough point in her life,
and that was pretty much all through the 90s, and most of our life.” “My concern was
not leaving flakes everywhere. I get it all over the car, and I get it all over
my sheets, and my husband is the car guy. He likes them to be clean and he likes
them to be washed. But he would go out and he’d vacuum because it would just be
like snowflakes or whatever, I had all this skin shed all over the place. Likewise in my bedroom. You get out of bed in the morning and there’s, you, still in the
bed; like almost like one of those chalk lines from a crime scene; you know? And
it’s awkward and it’s icky and you don’t like it. So it’s just, I guess, one
of the perils of the disease. having a dermatologist I can trust, is
half the battle. So after discussing a lot of different
options, my doctor and I decided that Otezla would be the best thing for me to
try.” In clinical studies, approximately one out of three people with plaque
psoriasis saw 75% clearer skin after four months.
The most common side effects of Otezla were diarrhea, nausea, upper respiratory
tract infection, and headache. People who are allergic to Otezla or its components
should not take Otezla. Otezla is associated with severe diarrhea, nausea,
and vomiting; as well as depression, weight decrease, and interacting with
other medicines which may make Otezla less effective. For more information,
listen to the Important Safety Information at the end of this video and
read the Full Prescribing Information for Otezla. “It really seemed like
something I wanted to try and I’m thrilled I did. Since taking Otezla, I’ve
had a whole summer where I wasn’t as self-conscious of my body, with the
scales and the plaques, they are just better. They aren’t as red, they aren’t as
thick, they aren’t as itchy, I’m not leaving as many flakes places. I feel so
much better. It isn’t my main focus anymore, it doesn’t have to be.” “She’s
taking control of herself and her health issues, and she’s amazing.”
Do not take Otezla if you are allergic to apremilast
or to any of the ingredients in Otezla. Otezla can cause severe diarrhea, nausea,
and vomiting, especially within the first few weeks of treatment. Use in elderly
patients and the use of certain medications with Otezla appears to
increase the risk of having diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting. Tell your doctor if
any of these conditions occur. Otezla is associated with an increase in
depression. In clinical studies, some patients reported depression and
suicidal behavior while taking Otezla. Some patients stopped taking Otezla due
to depression. Before starting Otezla, tell your doctor if you have had
feelings of depression or suicidal thoughts or behavior. Be sure to tell
your doctor if any of these symptoms or other mood changes develop or worsen
during treatment with Otezla. Some patients taking Otezla lost body weight.
Your doctor should monitor your weight regularly.
If unexplained or significant weight loss occurs, your doctor will decide if
you should continue taking Otezla. Some medicines may make Otezla less effective, and should not be taken with Otezla. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you
take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines. Side effects
of Otezla include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, upper respiratory tract
infection, tension headache, and headache. These are not all the possible side
effects with Otezla. Ask your doctor about other potential side effects. Tell
your doctor about any side effect that bothers you or does not go away. Tell
your doctor if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or planning to
breastfeed. Otezla has not been studied in pregnant women or in women who are
breastfeeding. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of
prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-332-1088. Please read the Full Prescribing
Information for Otezla.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *