Injection Pain Relief Home Remedies – Cortisone Cream For Injection Reactions Symptoms

Injection Pain Relief Home Remedies – Cortisone Cream For Injection Reactions Symptoms


Injection Pain Relief Home Remedies are often
searched for online, and being a dermatologist I am asked very frequently how to treat these
local skin reactions, whether this concerns injecting testosterone for a TRT protocol,
vaccinations in babies and young children, or injection biological drugs for inflammatory
diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, or psoriasis.
In this video I will answer the question: Can we apply Cortisone Cream For Injection
Reactions Symptoms? What strength should I use, how aften do I apply it, and for how
long? Please like and subscribe. Thank you! And
hit that notification bell so you won’t miss anything. Corticosteroid medicines are derivatives of
the natural corticosteroid hormones that are produced by the adrenal glands. These have
many important functions in the body, including control of inflammatory responses.
Corticosteroid medicines are mainly used for their effect in controlling inflammation,
and topical corticosteroids are applied directly to your skin (as opposed to taking a pill
by mouth) to provide relief for a wide variety of dermatological conditions. They can also
be used as a relief for post injection pain and reactions, if these are not infected,
as I have explained in previous videos, that I will link under this one. Topical corticosteroids can be prescribed or purchased over-the-counter, depending on
their strength. Corticosteroids are often simply called steroids,
but it should be noted that they are very different from another group of steroids,
for example anabolic steroids. Topical steroids are absorbed into the skin
cells. They stop these cells from producing various inflammation-causing chemicals that are normally released when the skin reacts to allergens or irritation. These inflammation-causing chemicals include prostaglandins and various other inflammatory
substances. They cause blood vessels to widen and other
inflammatory substances to arrive, resulting in the affected area of skin becoming red,
swollen and itchy. By preventing these inflammatory chemicals
from being released in the skin, corticosteroids reduce inflammation and relieve its related
symptoms such as itchiness. They can come in different forms including: Creams, the form that’s prescribed most often,
are a mixture of water and oils and usually contains a preservative. They’re especially
good for hairy and wet areas and are easily applied without a greasy feel. Ointments are made of oils and little to no water and don’t usually contain a preservative.
They’re great for dry, scaly skin or areas with thick skin like the soles of your feet
and the palms of your hands. Gels are made with water and propylene glycol
and, like creams, they’re easy to apply. Solutions, foams, and lotions usually contain
oil, water, and other chemicals and are used on your scalp. Topical steroids can be divided into four
different strengths – mild, moderate, potent and very potent. The strength of a topical
steroid is determined by a standardized test that measures the extent to which it can cause
your blood vessels to constrict in the upper dermis (the layer of skin that’s just below
the outer epidermis). Comparatively speaking, a very potent topical
steroid is between 600 and 1,000 times stronger than a mild one. The mildest one is Hydrocortisone 1%. Of course
there are different brand names. Very often this strength can be bought over-the-counter. Moderate strength cortisone creams are Triamcinolone acetonide 0.1%, Fluocinolone acetonide 0.025%,
and Mometasone furoate 0.1%. Potent strength topical corticosteroids include
dipropionate 0.05%, Betamethasone dipropionate 0.05%, and Betamethasone valerate 0.1%.
Very potent strength topical corticosteroids include Clobetasol propionate 0.05%, and Betamethasone dipropionate 0.25%. Okay, now to the practical side of things.
To get relief of inflammatory post-injection reactions such as pain, swelling and redness,
a potent or even very potent strength topical corticosteroid can be used.
There is no need to worry about frequently mentioned side-effects such as skin thinning
(atrophy), enlarged blood vessels (telangiectasia) and Stretch marks (striae), since all these
are really only seen on prolonged use of unnecessarily potent topical steroids, and not at all if
you use them as indicated for inflammatory post-injection reactions. The general recommendations are using this potent to very potent strength topical corticosteroid
for 3 to 5 days maximum, and massage the cream on the affected area twice or three times
a day. Okay, I hope this advise helped you out. Leave
the video a thumbs up, and make sure that notification bell is turned on, just to be
sure not to miss any new uploads. Feel free to comment or ask questions under this video.
I try to answer everything, every day.

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