How does a Dermatologist treat Rosacea

How does a Dermatologist treat Rosacea


Rosacea is a very common dermatology skin
condition. It is an inflammatory dermatitis that
causes flushing and blushing, predominantly of
the face but occasionally of ears and can also cause redness of the eyes. Rosacea is very frequently encountered in
dermatological settings. In the United States 1 in 20 patients
suffers from Rosacea. The cause of Rosacea is unknown to Dermatologists. It is a dermatology condition that is usually recognized as being triggered by a number of common
factors. Most commonly Rosacea is triggered by spicy food, hot beverages, alcohol and changes in
temperature of the environment. It is also triggered
by ultraviolet light. Dermatologists know that Rosacea tends to appear more in some families than in other families so there is a family
background to Rosacea too. There are four types
or Rosacea. Each type of Rosacea is characterized by
certain signs and symptoms. The predominant feature of each type
of Rosacea is some form of redness. The most commonly encountered type of Rosacea is one with deeply seated erythema, so uniform redness, most often noticed over the cheeks, but also on the nose, forehead and on the chin. Rosacea can be
predominantly papular and pustular. The pustular component can be so
prominent that the condition is sometimes mistaken for Acne vulgaris. The dermatology conditions Acne and Rosacea can coexist. Sometimes the treatment of one of these conditions can unmask the other condition. It is very important for Dermatologists to
distinguish between the two conditions as some treatments can help both conditions but there are treatments that can worsen the other condition. With the treatment of Rosacea it is very important to recognize a trigger for any flare-ups. I often advise patients to keep a
diary and to see what is relevant for their particular
type of Rosacea. I also emphasize the common triggers such as ultraviolet light, changes in temperature, spicy food, alcohol and stress. If possible these triggers should be avoided. The second line treatment by Dermatologists would be topical treatments that often contain metronidazole gel or azelaic acid gel and a third-line
treatment by Dermatologists would be systemic therapy. In addition laser treatments can
be very effective for treating dilated blood vessels and for treating general
redness of the face.

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