Cory’s Story | Getting back to the music

Cory’s Story | Getting back to the music


Otezla® (apremilast) is a prescription
medicine approved for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque
psoriasis, for whom phototherapy or systemic therapy is appropriate. I started playing guitar when I was about six. I always wanted to be that guy that
could hear song on the radio and pick up a guitar and just play it. Both my
grandpas loved old country music, and I think the motivation that that got me
was, “Hey it’d be great if you could learn a certain song, I’d love to sing
it for you.” What brought me to Nashville is the love of music. Nashville has this
amazing thing where you go to a restaurant and the waitress is a better
singer than than you are; or, you know, the garbage man is a better guitar
player than you are; and that’s, to me that’s just so cool to be involved
in that. I’ve had several symptoms throughout my life, psoriasis runs in my
family. I first noticed the psoriasis on my ears, on my arms, and on my knees; those
were never a showstopper. But the ones that were on my hands, you can’t hide
those. My symptoms were cracked, bleeding, dry skin. You take for granted the use of
your hands; you take for granted how often people see your hands.
I got to the point with my social life where I just stopped going out.
My cousin’s wife works for a dermatology office, and it was her saying “you have
got to do something about this.” Finally ended up going to a dermatologist. I
tried a lot of over-the-counter creams and ointments; and you know nothing nothing
seemed to do the trick; and I would think ‘okay maybe this is
gonna be the one.’ And after several attempts at nothing working, it was at
that point I knew that it was time to try something different. The first time I
heard about Otezla was through my dermatologist. in clinical studies, approximately one
out of three people with plaque psoriasis saw 75% clearer skin after
four months. The most common side effects of Otezla were diarrhea, nausea, upper
respiratory tract infection and headache. People who are allergic to Otezla, or its
components, should not take Otezla. Otezla is associated with severe diarrhea,
nausea, and vomiting; as well as depression, weight decrease, and
interacting with other medicines, which may make Otezla less effective. For more
information, listen to the Important Safety
Information at the end of this video and read the Full Prescribing Information
for Otezla. When I first started taking Otezla, I remember the dermatologists
warned me about some your side effects; we definitely talked about it. Initially
my doctor told me that it could very well take up to four months to see any
results; I was really fortunate in that it was a lot sooner for me. it was such a
relief when that moment finally came where my hands were better. I was finally
able to sit at a table with some friends and not be embarrassed. I was able to
play guitar again! Every song has a story, but within every story lies a song. Some
of the songs that I wrote, they were kind of speaking to some of the difficulties
that I was having with psoriasis. There was always a major part of me that just
loved to play and love music. Now, here I am on stage making it happen. Do not take Otezla if you are allergic
to apremilast or to any of the ingredients in Otezla. Otezla can cause
severe diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, especially within the first few weeks of
treatment. Use in elderly patients and the use of certain medications with
Otezla appears to increase the risk of having diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting. Tell
your doctor if any of these conditions occur. Otezla is associated with an
increase in depression. In clinical studies, some patients reported
depression and suicidal behavior while taking Otezla. Some patients stop taking
Otezla due to depression. Before starting Otezla, tell your doctor if you have had
feelings of depression or suicidal thoughts or behavior. Be sure to tell
your doctor if any of these symptoms or other mood changes develop or worsen
during treatment with Otezla. Some patients taking otezla lost body weight.
Your doctor should monitor your weight regularly. If unexplained or significant
weight loss occurs, your doctor will decide if you should continue taking
Otezla. Some medicines may make Otezla less effective, and should not be taken
with Otezla. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including
prescription and non-prescription medicines. Side effects of Otezla include
diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, upper respiratory tract infection, tension
headache and headache. These are not all the possible side effects with Otezla.
Ask your doctor about other potential side effects. Tell your doctor about any
side effect that bothers you or does not go away. Tell your doctor if you are
pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or planning to breastfeed.
Otezla has not been studied in pregnant women, or in women who are breastfeeding.
You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to
the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-332-1088. Please read the Full Prescribing Information for Otezla.

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