All Desktop Videos

All Desktop Videos


Welcome to VisualDx, bringing accurate
informed decision-making to the point of care. Built by doctors for doctors and
healthcare professionals, we offer the most powerful
differential builder in medicine. From the homepage you can build a differential by entering a chief complaint, medication, or other finding such as travel. A 48-year-old woman visits her doctor with a rash of smooth nodules on her trunk and the gradual onset of a cough. From the homepage, let’s type in rash. Add smooth nodules. We can click through the workup to add findings or quickly type them into the additional findings box. Under location of skin finding let’s add trunk by clicking on the drawing or click a more detailed area by using the arrow. We’ll then type in cough. You’ll notice on the right you can change the age and sex of the patient. Watch the DDx Strength Indicator to see how strong your differential will be
based on a findings you have entered. The length, color, and wording change as
findings are added. Let’s remove our last finding and add it again to see how the finding affects the strength indicator. Our Edit Findings video talks more about
this feature. You can view the differential at any time. The differential is broken down into this tab view so you can more quickly narrow down your diagnostic possibilities. Please watch the Viewing Differential
Results video for a more detailed walkthrough. Thanks to VisualDx, the patient in this case study was accurately diagnosed with sarcoidosis. Thanks to customer feedback, VisualDx is making
it easier for you to both broaden your differential and arrive at the correct diagnosis quickly
with a couple design changes. Let’s look at a differential diagnosis of
a 48-year-old male with smooth nodules on his trunk. and a non-productive cough. There are now 6 tabs for you to look at: Consider First, Consider Second, Emergencies, Infectious, Drug-Induced, and View All. Let’s explain each one. “Consider First” shows the most common
and important diagnoses. This is the default tab when you click “view
this differential” unless you enter specific findings. But we’ll talk about that in a little bit. “Consider Second” shows
uncommon and rare diagnoses. “View All” combines the diseases from
consider first and consider second into one page. “Emergencies” groups all diagnoses classified
as emergencies, whether they are life-threatening or require immediate attention. “Infectious” shows infectious diseases. “Drug induced” shows any drug-related
diagnoses. The number on each tab indicates how many
diagnoses are grouped in those categories. Now, consider first is the default tab, but
there are a few exceptions. When you enter certain types of findings,
the system will show you a different tab first. If you enter a travel finding at any point
– let’s say your patient just returned from Puerto Rico – the Infectious tab defaults to the front. If you enter a medication as a chief complaint,
the Drug Induced tab appears first. In some cases, your best match for a diagnosis
based on the findings you entered will be in the “Consider second” tab. If this is the case, you will see a message
letting you know. Learn how we display diagnoses
in the Diagnoses in the Differential View video. Here at VisualDx we’re making it easier
for you to both broaden your differential and get to the correct diagnosis quickly
with a couple design changes. Here’s the differential of a 27-year-old
female with vomiting, abdominal pain, delirium, headache, fatigue, and a rash. Aside from the way diagnoses are now arranged in tabs at first glance the diagnoses
themselves are shown in a familiar way using a photo, Sympticon, or radiology image. Let’s take a closer look at some
new features. Each diagnosis now has a match strength indicator under its name. This tells you how many of your findings match the diagnosis you are considering. West Nile Virus and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, in this case, match all 6 findings. Their match strength bars are green and full. Streptococcal Pharyngitis
matches 5 of your 6 findings. Its match strength is yellow
and the bar isn’t full. Quickly discover which findings don’t match by hovering over the disease. Delirium is not connected with Streptococcal Pharyngitis and is crossed off in the list. Underneath the image or Sympticon are icons that quickly show you more information about the diagnosis. A plane indicates a
diagnosis that can be travel related, so Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever has a plane. But there’s a catch. If you add a travel finding when creating your differential, the plane icon won’t show up because VisualDx already knows YOU KNOW you’re considering travel. if you don’t put in a travel finding, but the diagnosis could be travel-related, the plane will show up. A pill indicates a diagnosis that may
be caused by a medication reaction. Another icon you might see is a
radiation symbol which indicates a diagnosis resulting from chemical,
biologic, radiation, or nuclear exposure. The camera shows how many disease photos, Sympticons, and other images we have in our database for that disease. There are 33 images connected to Rocky Mountain spotted fever. You can view your differential in different formats. We’re in photo view now. This is the Sympticon view. And here’s how the list view is displayed. Now you can also use the default view to see a mix of images and Sympticons that best represent each diagnosis. Learn more about diagnosing adverse medication reactions using VisualDx in the video Medication Adverse Events. VisualDX is your source to properly
identify drug reactions and medication adverse events. Begin by typing in a medication such
as naproxen. Now follow the guided workup or add any additional findings. We’re going to enter blanching patch. You can change the sex and age of the patient
if you wish and view the differential at any time. Since naproxen is our chief complaint,
diagnoses under the drug-induced tab appear first. The number in the tab indicates how
many diagnoses are categorized as drug-induced. Click on a diagnosis for a quick glance. The medication citations associated
with this diagnosis are front and center for you to review. You can also click through to our full article
or view all images. Access peer-reviewed expert information
designed for the point-of-care by utilizing our smart search feature. Simply type in a diagnosis to access photos, quick therapy options, and more. A physician in the emergency department sees a patient with eye pain. Using a slit-lamp, she notices an unusual finding and believes the patient may have herpes in the cornea. The doctor searches for
herpes simplex virus keratitis. there the doctor clicks on “view all images” to find the photo that looks just like her patient. The doctor then can review the synopsis,
ICD10 code, diagnostic pearls, differential diagnosis and pitfalls, best
tests, management pearls, therapy, and references. Thanks to the quick action and early treatment, the patient avoids vision loss and scarring of the cornea. Build confidence with your patient by
showing them their diagnosis at the point-of-care. VisualDx also provides handouts for the
most common and important diagnoses. Simply click ‘information for patients’ on the left navigation menu or under the diagnosis title on the top banner. Choose to provide a handout for a child or
adult with the diagnosis. Select your patient’s native language. The text is written so that patients
will find it easy to read and understand. You have the option to either
print or email the patient handout. Select the image that best matches your patient or choose to share the content without an image
by unchecking the image check box. The content within VisualDx is
researched, written, and vetted by a team of 100 physicians on our editorial board. We also staff a team of medical librarians to review and research the
content and references. All content has undergone a thorough peer review process to ensure it’s timely and accurate. The text under each diagnosis is
written for the point of care so that it can be reviewed
while you are with your patient. We include Synopsis, ICD Codes, What to Look For, Diagnostic Pearls, Differential Diagnosis and Pitfalls, Best Tests, Management Pearls, Therapy, Associated
Medications, and References. We also provide integration with UpToDate for
institutional licenses, if available, as well as PubMed. Let’s review how to edit your findings
once you build your differential. For example, your patient’s chief complaint is
abdominal pain. In the workup, we’ll add nausea, vomiting, developed acutely over
days to weeks, and appears ill. On the right side of the screen all your
findings are listed. Your chief complaint is highlighted with a green circle, meaning it’s a required finding. Required findings will be found in every
diagnosis in your differential result. You can add more findings, delete findings by clicking on the X, or make other findings required. Once you click ‘view this differential’ you can easily return to the workup page by hitting the back button, the patient findings link, or the add or remove button next to your
findings at the top of the screen. With VisualDx, tens of thousands of
medical images vetted by our medical image team are right at your fingertips. We pride ourselves on the variation of disease presentation available in VisualDx including skin type, body location, and stage of disease. Let’s look at psoriasis.
Begin by clicking the ‘view all images’ button. Now click on ‘filter images.’ There
you can filter based on skin pigmentation, image type, and body location. Consider experimenting with a combination of filters to further refine your results. These filters help you quickly narrow
your search to find the image that best
matches your patient’s presentation. You can also hide genital and severe images if you are scrolling through images with a patient. Some of our images come with captions. You can turn that feature on or
off with the captions checkbox. You also have the ability to
print the pictures you’ve filtered. The differential diagnosis strength
indicator visually shows you if the findings you are adding to your workup
translate to a narrow and meaningful differential. As you enter more findings
the indicator changes colors and strengths depending on whether or not
your findings match a relevant diagnosis. If the DDx strength is red it indicates
a broader differential. A yellow or green DDx strength indicator means that the differential has narrowed your possible diagnoses. Also note you can read how
strong your differential from none to weak, moderate, good, strong, and, finally,
excellent. At anytime while building a differential, you can add more findings or simply view the differential you have built regardless of the strength of your findings. The VisualDx homepage has many great
features and functions. First let’s tell you how to quickly get started. Begin by typing a chief complaint, medication,
diagnosis, or travel finding. You can also click on the Quick Start Differential Builder to start building a differential from the most common chief complaints by specialty. Other features of our homepage include signing up for your personal mobile account if you are an institutional user. Learn more in our
How to Download the Mobile App video. You can also access your CME Credits,
Important News and Links, and Public Health and Education resources. On the top left menu, you can quickly start over, get to our commercial site, learn more about VisualDx,
provide feedback and/or a case study, as well as access our support materials. You can also change the language and
region in which you are working. Changing the region will provide diagnoses
endemic to that region when applicable. On the top right, find the features for sharing a page, changing your language and region, sending feedback to VisualDx, and signing out. If you are logged into your personal account on the web, your email address is a link to another menu where you can access your account, CME, links to the Apple Store and Google Play, and sign out. You can access VisualDx anytime, anywhere by creating your own personal mobile account. Here’s how. From a clinical computer go to visualdx.com/visualdx. Click “Get the Mobile App.” Then create your own personal account by filling out the simple form. Download the VisualDx app to your Apple or Android smartphone or tablet. Then launch the app and sign in with the credentials you created and you’re ready to go.

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