11 Things You Need To Know About PSORIASIS (Part 3/4) | HoaiXuanDuong.com

11 Things You Need To Know About PSORIASIS (Part 3/4) | HoaiXuanDuong.com


Q7) Is psoriasis caused by the body’s
autoimmune attacking its own cells? Not really. When a fungus attempts to attack one’s skin surface, itchiness is the first symptom that the body notices. The human immune system automatically
identifies it as a foreign cell, and attempts to attack it, as well as
eliminate damaged or deformed cells. The body keeps producing new cells
underneath the bad cells, so over time, the infected skin becomes thicker, and the dead skin could easily fall off as flakes. Please note: Our auto immunity
only attacks the bad cells. It never ever attacks its own good cells. Q8) How is psoriasis formed? As discussed earlier, during the first
or second stages of a skin disorder, psoriasis is formed when: a) The condition was left untreated or had been treated, but the treatment failed, thus allowing fungi to successfully
invade the external layer of skin. The fungi treat this as their source of food. b) Over time, the fungi can successfully
become parasitic on one’s skin, causing infection. Skin cells become deformed and are
rejected by our body’s immune system. c) Our body’s immunity attacks the fungi,
and defeats those deformed cells. At the same time, our body produces new cells to
replace the dead and deformed ones. d) Dead and deformed cells that are
about to fall off are seen as flakes. e) When the fungi actively disable
our body’s immune system, they develop and spread freely,
thus psoriasis is formed. It could become a disaster when
psoriasis spreads all over the body. Q9) How does psoriasis flare up? Psoriasis is a condition of infection
caused by fungal invasion. Fungi are a type of micro organism. Thousand fold under the microscope,
they look like a plant. In a disadvantegeous environment, fungi withdraw themselves like
trees withering in winter. Psoriasis seems like it has gone away. In an advantageous environment, fungi appear like trees
sprouting leaves in spring. This phenomenon is called a “flare up”. If left untreated or if treatment fails, each “flare up” of psoriasis is an advantage for fungi to further invade the body,
spreading faster and stronger. Their roots grow deeper, which contributes to the difficulty
and complications in treatment. In the next video, we’ll talk about
how to prevent psoriasis, and how to treat psoriasis successfully.

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