10 Signs and Symptoms of Ringworm

10 Signs and Symptoms of Ringworm


10 Signs and Symptoms of Ringworm. After reading the word ‘ringworm,’ does
your mind imagine a swarm of tiny little worms, wiggling and slithering around under your
skin? It’s quite possible and you certainly wouldn’t
be alone. For ringworm, along with a multitude of other
medical terms can be misleading, if ever so slightly. Ringworm, or dermatophytosis, is not a worm,
nor is it associated with worms of any kind. In fact, there is a good chance you might
have had a type of ringworm and not even known it. In reality, ringworm is a skin infection that
is caused by a fungal infection on the surface of the skin. The name ‘ringworm’ was originally derived
from an early belief that the infection was caused by worms as a result of the common
ring like rashes that appear on the body. Once again, and for the last time – ringworm
has nothing to do with worms. So how might you already have had ringworm
and not known it? Well, many people get ringworm in-between
their toes – or as it is also known as athlete’s foot. And if it spread to your groin; you might
be familiar with the term jock itch. Both are very common, and both are a type
of ringworm. Ringworm is very communicable, meaning that
it can easily spread from one person to another. This can occur in a multitude of ways including: From person to person by touching a person
who has the infection. From touching items which have been in contact
with an infected person. For example, towels, clothes, bed linen or
chairs which have been used by somebody who has ringworm. From animals such as dogs, cats, guinea pigs,
and cattle have fungal infections on their skin. They can pass on the infection, especially
to children. (Animals can be treated too if you suspect
a pet is the cause) Farm animals can also be a source. Touching a farm gate where infected animals
pass through may be enough to infect your skin. From soil. Although this rarely occurs, fungi can be
present in soil, and you can get the infection from contact with soil. So now that we know how you can potentially
catch ringworm, the next important question is how would you know if you did? While the name ‘ringworm’ is one that
you might not be too keen on using, especially given its heavily misguided understanding,
the fact remains it is very treatable and nothing to be ashamed off. However, you need to know you have it before
you can treat it, so with that in mind, allow us to present to you the 10 most common signs
of ringworm. 1. Dry Skin. If you are a male suffering from ringworm
you might notice that some of your facial hair begins to fall out. While this doesn’t happen in every case
of ringworm, and obviously in women, it can be a rather shocking symptom to witness, especially
if you haven’t already been diagnosed. If you notice that the skin on your face,
neck, and surrounding areas are becoming more dry, despite your best efforts at moisturizing,
it can also be an indicator of a ringworm infection. And while dry skin is certainly not the most
alarming of symptoms, it is important to note that sometimes the most common symptoms, the
rash, might be covered by hair, making it less visible. 2. Cracked and Burning Skin on the Foot. Although incredibly common, but often overlooked,
ringworm of the foot, also known as athlete’s foot, or tinea pedis, is actually a result
of the same strand of fungal infection. The main cause of it is not drying one’s feet
thoroughly after taking a shower or bath, or by not removing sweat build up after working
out. When this occurs, the skin on the side of
your feet can begin to crack. You might also notice small sores developing
between your toes, and it will appear as though the skin has worn away, exposing a red, irritable
and burning infection. 3. Loss of Hair in Patches. While the loss of facial hair as a result
of ringworm is typically an unwanted side effect that impacts men, it is prudent to
remember that facial hair isn’t the only type of hair loss that can result from a ringworm
infection. Much like with the facial hair loss, ringworm
on the scalp can cause you to lose hair in patches. This is likely to be far more noticeable than
with facial hair as you will notice large strands of hair falling away during the daytime. It will also occur when you brush or comb
your hair, pulling away flaky skin as well as hair. Not only is hair loss a general symptom of
ringworm, but it is a symptom that can in and of itself lead to other sub-symptoms,
such as low self-esteem, mood swings, and irritability. What’s the connection you might ask? Well, if you found yourself suddenly losing
your hair, how good of a mood would you be in? 4. Scaling Patterns on Feet. When a ringworm infection is present on someone’s
feet, a common symptom is the appearance of a scaling pattern on the skin. This usually occurs on the sole of the foot,
as well as the side and in between the toes. While an infection of ringworm on the hand
will usually limit itself to one side, when it affects the feet it is common for both
feet to be infected, especially if both feet have been exposed to similar conditions. 5. Itchy and Scaly Skin. If a person has a ringworm infection on their
scalp, there is a very good chance that they will not notice the rash, if in fact, it is
even present. However, that person will probably still be
aware of something that is a little off, especially considering all the other symptoms associated
with it. A person with ringworm will likely notice
that their scalp is incredibly itchy and feel scaly to the touch. This condition is called tinea capitis, and
it is often accompanied by crusting and blisters that often ooze with pus. This occurs in the most serious instances
of the infection, but it is by no means an uncommon symptom. In the worst case scenario and if the infection
is severe enough, the sufferer might notice a large and swollen sore on their scalp. This is known as a keroin, and it will be
pus-filled and can result in swollen lymph glands and a high fever, simulating some of
the symptoms of the flu or a cold. 6. Thickening of Skin on Hands. Depending on your age, where you are from,
and what your background is, being told that you have ‘a thick skin,’ can often be
taken as a compliment. It means that you are tough, strong, and don’t
let the little, unimportant things bother you. However, if we are talking about ringworm
and thick skin, what was once a compliment can quickly turn into something uncomfortable. For sufferers of ringworm with an infection
on the hand, it is a common occurrence to experience a thickening of the skin around
the affected area. Some parts of the skin on the hand will mysteriously
get thicker and tougher and can become quite uncomfortable, without any initial itch or
pain. Usually, this will occur between the fingers,
making it uncomfortable to move the fingers around too much or perform regular tasks. Although not as common, this symptom may also
occur on the palm of the hand. 7. Facial Hair Loss. If you haven’t noticed the stereotypical
rash associated with ringworm, you might find that your facial hair begins to fall out in
patches, either on its own or when grooming. It is the reason, among others that we will
discuss shortly, that further demonstrate the point that these symptoms, like any other
ailment, should be viewed holistically and not taken as secular occurrences. 8. Red or Brown Spots on Groin Area. As we mentioned at the top of this article,
ringworm can take many forms, some of which you, in all likelihood have experienced in
one form or another. When ringworm is present around the groin,
it is what is known as jock itch or tinea cruris. Sufferers will begin to notice small red or
brown sores around their groin, usually affecting the boots and inner thighs, although it will
not affect one’s genitalia. 9. Oozing Blisters. Much like the name implies, oozing blisters
are as unsightly as they are uncomfortable. In many cases of ringworm, more specifically,
athletes foot, the sores and scaly skin of the feet can be accompanied by blisters that
ooze with pus, or later, might possibly crust over to create a layer of skin that is flaky,
itchy and incredibly sore. These blisters normally occur between the
toes, but aren’t limited to that location; they can also form on the bottom and sides
of the feet. An evident sign that you are dealing with
ringworm and not another type of infection is in the case ringworm, the top of the foot
is usually left relatively unaffected. 10. Rash But Only on One Side. Following the typical chronological order
of things, often proceeding the thickening of the skin, a ringworm infection can then
be accompanied by an itch, redness, and swelling. When these occur, they will typically look
like the ring type rashes that we discussed earlier, although that doesn’t always have
to be the case. It is also worth mentioning that usually,
this type of rash will only occur on one side, a fact in which doctors are not too sure as
to the reason. And while it is possible for the rash to occur
on both sides, it is much less common.

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