044: Kythira, Santorini and a mad dash Sail Across Cyclades to Turkey

044: Kythira, Santorini and a mad dash Sail Across Cyclades to Turkey


We arrived in Greece that’s been a long
haul that has from Spain. I feel like we’ve been at sea for most the month. We
didn’t think we’re coming back actually this is a really nice place it’s the
first island it’s sort of like north of Crete south of Peloponnese. So some of these Greek islands you have
these boutique hotels that do these kind of retreats and you have yoga retreats
and writing retreats and this particular boutique hotel happened to have an
orchestra retreat where amateur violinists and cellist who haven’t practice for a
while can go for a week or two and do a final performance at the end of the
holiday. So Darry being a budding violinist was particularly interesting this. So it’s times like this when you see the
kids watching group activities that you kind of realize that they are missing
out on things like team sports and orchestras and things like that. It makes
you question what you’re doing sometimes So when we arrive in port, there’s always a lot of things to be done. Cleaning the boat, getting the salt off the boat and usually we have a nice big breakfast as
well because we’ve been going for days. Yes so over here we’ve got some rinsing
going on – this is our new system now we’re rinsing everything in seawater
first before we wash it in fresh water. And a knife a fork fell down into the water and now Peter is going to get it because he done it! Sometimes we lose things
overboard and we have to go and get them. Of course we did our usual trick in
these places that we’ve never been to before and we happened to park on the
ferry dock so we had to kind of move the boat along in order to let the ferry in. So Darry, ever one to spot a
money-making opportunity raced out there with his guitar to try and do some
busking but he only caught the last few dregs of the people getting off the
ferry so it wasn’t as lucrative as it usually is. So when you have crew onboard they inevitably
become part of the family. and the kids love to interact with
new people – obviously mum and dad being on board 24 hours a day isn’t that
exciting so new people on board obviously give them some new outlets.
Pete happens to have a doctorate in chemistry so he did take some of the
science lessons that we do in homeschooling. I hate to perpetuate
regional stereotypes but Pete is a scouser from Liverpool and he did also
teach them how to fight and he did actually send them a lock-picking kit
after he left as well! So this morning, Woody goes out for his run and the boys say they want to go. He was a bit far away because he was up here and I said I’ll come at least until you meet him. We ended up walking up this massive mountain. And we get an amazing view of where our
boat is but we haven’t started homeschooling yet so we need to do that when we go
back down. So we got woken up in the middle of the
night with this horrendous noise. The wind was supposed to be a gentle breeze three
knots from the north and we’ve got – well as you can see it’s a lot more than that –
and the swell is horrendous even though it should be a sheltered bay the swell seems
to be coming in the opposite direction of the wind and swirling round. So we’ve got
real problems on the dock. The lines are really snatching at the cleats, the fenders are rubbing, the guy next door has lost his fenders So I think we’re just going to get an early start. I think we’re just going top leave. It’s too dangerous to stay on the dock. So we’re just filling up with water – get the lines ready and we’re going. It’s so nice to get off that dock. You can feel the swell out here. It’s one of those
circular bays it was just bouncing back on the dock so I didn’t get any sleep. That was Kathira and now we’re headed to
Santorini – bit of an early start but we couldn’t stay on that dock much longer. So we’re going on our final leg – the final leg from Kithera and hopping along the
Cyclades to Turkey so we were getting a bit nervous because we couldn’t find any
fresh vegetables but luckily this guy went to the other side of the island for
us and he stopped up so we’re back in business again. Broccoli, lettuce and
like a whole bucket full of spinach so yeah we’re really happy. Do you like spinach Peter? Love it, can’t wait to have loads. Spinach mm! Better than a T-bone steak isn’t it? Ice cream? So since we
left Spain I’ve started to develop this itchy scalp and my hair is falling out
so I think it might be psoriasis. I’ve always had to thin hair anyway and I
think I’ve always had to deal with that and then now I’ve kind of – it’s like
double whammy – it’s like, okay forget the thin hair let’s give you something worse
than that. Luckily I’ve got my friend on board who, kind of is very understanding
not like Woody I know and she’s been trying to help me diagnose it and take
care of it. But it’s really difficult because you can’t go – I really
need to see a doctor but you can’t find a doctor when you’re moving all the
time and it’s like you’ve got enough problems trying to find someone
to anchor and somebody to get to shore and so much believe you’re dinghy, never mind dealing with other problems. So I kind of can’t wait to get to Turkey because
we’re gonna stop for a few months and I’m gonna try and find a doctor but it’s
it’s just the fact that my hair is falling out it’s really I don’t how to describe
it it’s depressing actually. You know you have those lepers that
people don’t want to go near? You look at it and think it’s something disgusting and
that’s what it is nothing can make it nice – I can’t shave my head and make it
look good and the kids have been really good because they’ve been not telling
anyone and they’ve just been.. Rowan has been really sweet she sort of tells
me where my hair’s falling out and tries to help me cover it up. Woody’s told me
it’s sexy so there you go. You can’t pretend it’s nice – it’s not. The only thing I can do is wear a hat or a scarf and look like a little gypsy girl. So that’s what I’m going to do. This is Santorini. We just going around the sheltered side of the island now. So we’ve anchored
our boats out from the bay and now we’re getting a bus to Fira. Giros at last. Giros! they wanted a giros so much – we’re finally getting them. It’s a giros! ..and a mythos! So we’ve got the bus from Fira town to
Akrotiri which is an ongoing archaeological excavation site where
this whole population that was living this golden age was wiped out by the
volcanic eruption. So life came to an abrupt halt in the flourishing city of
Akrotiri during the final quarter of the 17th
century when its inhabitants abandoned it due to powerful earthquakes and the
enormous volcanic eruption that followed. It finished the life for everybody on this
island. There was volcanoes and earthquakes and they buried the people
ALIVE! So that means they turned into rocks. It would look very cool. I saw this statue and I thought it was somebody dried but it was like this famous person.. ..but then it wasn’t. So we left Santorini I’ve got to say we
were left a bit disappointed with it – we didn’t really get to see much of the
island basically because he was so crowded – I can’t believe – I’ve never
been to a place with so many tourists packed in one small space. We kind of
cut short our visit there and decided to press on. The other reason
we’ve set off a day earlier than expected is because we’ve heard from
friends that the Port Authorities around the Cyclades are enforcing this cruising tax
which has just come in and this cruising tax means you pay every month and we’ve
only got a few days left of this month and it seems ridiculous paying such a huge
sum of money just for a couple of days to spend in the Cyclades. Some friends of
ours have been stopped four times already so we just think it’s not worth
it so unfortunately we’re going to cut our visit short to the Cyclades and
crack on towards Turkey. So this is it we’re on the final stretch now into Turkey we’ve passed through kythira and Santorini – through the Cyclades just
above Crete – and now we’re just on the final stretch in four hours time we
should be in Bozburun on the Turkish coast which will end our epic journey
across the Mediterranean in the last few weeks. So yeah it’s been quite quick but
we’re on time because we’ve got a few things planned in Turkey we’ve got the
rigging to do, the sails to do we want a canopy built and a few other odd jobs.
But it means that we can enjoy the rest of the summer kind of
exploring this part of the Mediterranean which we haven’t been to before – well not
by yacht anyway – and the wonderful country of Turkey which is quite mysterious
and exotic and also got a fantastic reputation for sailing as well. The
only thing to do watch out for around this part of the coast is the Meltemi which is the winds that come in from the north. The place were going to is quite
sheltered so we should be alright. We’re going to tie up to the town quay tonight I think
and swallow that expense just while we sort ourselves out and hopefully get checked
in – we’ve already got an agent who’s processing and our stuff. We run a dry
boat when on passage which means we don’t have any alcohol in fact we don’t
even bring coffee because it interrupts the sleep patterns and your watch system
so it’s a bit of a detox actually when do long passages like this. So yes we’re
going to enjoy a couple of Turkish beers and take it easy.
I think turkeys a little less crowded although this year might be a bit
different because as the Greeks introduced their cruising tax it might
mean that everybody suddenly flies towards Turkey and it might be quite overcrowded
in Turkey – who knows. Anyway we’ll report back and let you know how it goes.
My phone has just let me know how much it costs to make calls here – so I know we’re
here, even though on the chart it doesn’t look like we’ve crossed the border yet but I
think we might be in the Turkish seas now. Yes so it’s pretty good going really. We
left on the 8th of May now it’s the 31st of May that took about 23 days.
Everything’s pretty much intact apart from the mainsail which has had it
really. Woody just sort of pulled the bottom just to kind of an ease out a bit
and it just ripped so yeah it’s definitely ready to be replaced I think
we definitely need a new main and all the others are pretty ragged. So yeah
all good stuff looking forward to it. Peter’s doing the pilotage. We’re in a very sheltered Bay of Bozburun in Turkey. This is where we’re going to check-in. We’ve got an agent who’s going
to be meeting us and he’s gonna be doing all our paperwork and then we might move
on from here tomorrow, but yeah it’s a nice place to start off with really shelters. Are you a happy man? I’m very happy. I’m going to start the day with absorbing myself in local Turkish culture by having a
full English breakfast – Two fried eggs, fried bread, tomatoes, sausage, bacon, beans
mushrooms, and of course HP. Welcome to Turkey! Somebody sat on my favourite glasses. Alex is like the model on the boat. He’s also a scouser from Liverpool so he also taught them how to
box when you’re drunk and how to nick cars and pick locks as well. okay so thank you everybody for
watching these videos and thank you for sharing them. Thanks especially to the
patrons for helping us to get the equipment to create these videos – to edit
and then produce them and also to get ice creams for the children to get them
out the way so we’ve got time to create these video blogs. Thanks a lot.

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